One of their own: When the rapids took the life of Shannon Christy, local kayakers refused to leave her behind.

WILL SEEBER wasn’t worried at first.

The 24-year-old Bethesda kayaker had made his way down the Potomac River with fellow paddler Shannon Christy, so together they could run Great Falls, some of the most treacherous white water in the world.

As Seeber weaved through whirlpools and waves on the way to the falls in C&O Canal National Historical Park on that July afternoon last year, he could see Christy, a 23-year-old kayaker from South Carolina, paddling straight ahead. Seeber assumed she would stop to wait for him before attempting the difficult “line,” or path of descent, down the falls.

“I realized at the last second, ‘Oh, she’s not even stopping,’ ” Seeber says. “I wasn’t worried at that point. She paddled into it with purpose, and hit the line perfectly.”

Photo of Will Seeber by Skip Brown, courtesy of Bethesda Magazine.

Photo of Will Seeber by Skip Brown, courtesy of Bethesda Magazine.

Seeber paddled quickly to catch up, running the first waterfall right behind Christy, but found no sign of her. Assuming that Christy had continued down the falls, he kept paddling. He glimpsed Christy’s red boat above a section of the rapids known as the Five Fingers.

Then Seeber spotted the young woman.

She was trying to swim in full paddling gear, but the current was sweeping her downstream toward a dangerous death trap of water and rock called the Subway. As Seeber began sprinting toward her, Christy disappeared beneath the churning water.

By the end of that day, Christy’s disappearance had sparked a search involving dozens of kayakers and highly trained swift-water rescuers from Montgomery and Fairfax counties who took to the water in heavy-duty inflatable boats as news helicopters buzzed overhead, broadcasting the drama to the entire nation. For the elite local kayakers who would risk their lives to recover Christy’s body, the day would forever change the way they viewed the sport they loved.

But at first, it was just Seeber, furiously back-paddling away from the deadly channel in shock, trying to figure out how to save his friend.

To read more of this story, please visit Bethesda Magazine’s website.

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1 Comment

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One response to “One of their own: When the rapids took the life of Shannon Christy, local kayakers refused to leave her behind.

  1. Such a sad story. I guess if I had my choice, I’d die doing what I loved. As a trail runner I haven’t really had to think about that much; even with the chance of falling and hitting my head on a rock, the risk of death is relatively low.

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